MotherShip by Sam Wise ___ PLEASE REFRESH PAGE FOR WEB FONTS

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Hurricane

Grace Jones, 2008









[Tricky:]
From cradle to grave
From cradle to grave
From cradle to grave
From cradle to grave
From cradle to grave
From cradle to grave

[Grace:]
I am woman
I am sun
I can give birth to she
I can give birth to son
And I can be cool
Soft as the breeze,
I'll be a hurricane
Ripping up trees!

I am woman, I am sun
I am woman, I am sun

Can't see where I run
No matter how far!

I am woman, I am sun
I can give birth to she
I can give birth to son!
And I can be cool
Soft like the breeze,
I'll be a hurricane
Ripping up trees!

I can scheme, I can lie,
I'll take care of you, til the day you die.

I can hold brush, I can push broom,
When I walk by, flowers will bloom.

Once a man, twice a boy
Twice a man, once a boy

I'll be a hurricane, ripping up trees!

You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
I keep aching!

I can scheme, I can lie,
I'll take care of you, til the day you die.
I'll be a hurricane, ripping up trees!
You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
You keep taking
I keep aching! [x13] 




Grace Jones. For this photograph her body has been painted by the New York graffiti artist, Keith Haring (1958-1990), with his characteristic pictograms and decorations. Photo by Robert Mapplethorpe, 1984

Ima Morgan La Ruege
 


Sunday, 17 September 2017

Boccaccio '70

1962 


Tales of women (Sophia Loren, Anita Ekberg, Romy Schneider) by Italy's leading filmmakers. Stories include The Raffle, The Job and The Temptation of Dr. Antonio. Directed by Mario Monicelli, Federico Fellini, Luchino Visconti and Vittorio De Sica. Based on an idea by Cesare Zavattini, Boccaccio ‘70 is an anthology of four episodes, each by one of the directors, all about a different aspect of morality and love in modern times, in the style of Boccaccio.


Part one was replaced for audiences outside of Italy and I didn't enjoy it so I have not included that one.


In Le tentazioni del dottor Antonio (The Temptation of Dr Antonio), an elderly citizen is fed up with too much immorality in the form of indecent content in print. His anger knows no bounds when a provocative billboard of Anita Ekberg advertising "Drink more milk" is put up in a park near his residence. Little does he know how that billboard will go on to change his life. Throughout the film, children are heard singing the jingle "Bevete più latte, bevete più latte!" ("Drink more milk!") The image begins to haunt him with hallucinations in which she appears as a temptress and Dr. Antonio as St. George to spear the dragon – he is pursued and captured by the buxom Swedish star in a deserted Rome and at one point, his umbrella falls between her breasts.














Anita Ekberg & Federico Fellini by Elio Sorci, Boccaccio '70, Rome, 1961

Anita Ekberg & Federico Fellini

Anita Ekberg on the set of Boccaccio 70 by Marcello Geppetti



Federico Fellini supervises a poster of Anita Ekberg being hung (for the film Boccaccio 70)


For me, Romy Schneider stole the show...


La Fiancée de la Nuit: based on Guy de Maupassant, Romy Schneider plays a count's wife, the daughter of a rich German oligarch

Il lavoro (The Job) is about an aristocratic couple coming to terms with life and marriage after the domineering husband is caught visiting prostitutes by the press. Stars Romy Schneider and Tomas Milian










 
 

Mademoiselle Coco taught Romy Schneider how to be the most elegant figure in the early 60's. Visconti and Chanel, who made all of her clothes, created the miracle




Director Luchino Visconti with Romy Schneider

In La riffa (The Raffle), a timid lottery winner is entitled to one night with the attractive Zoe (Sophia Loren). Zoe, however, has other plans.











Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Sun Don't Shine

Whoopie Cat, 2016







Tina Packer in the 1968 Doctor Who episode 'The Web of Fear,' which was thought lost


The bluest of days.
Contrasted by the highest of lows.
We played through your maze,
to watch your walls continue to grow.
We became self aware,
reflective, yet so unprepared.
only ourselves to blame,
we work day and night to build our own cage.

The sun don't shine for me, no more.
The sun don't shine for me, oh, lord no.
The sun don't shine for me, no more.
The sun don't shine for me, oh no.

Oh lord, I know just how far you plan to go.
Just to take away the right
of those lost and dying souls.
Well, I don't need anyone telling me things are alright
when I got my own eyes.
I love, I love the way that you sleep as we cry out at night.

The sun don't shine for me, no more.
The sun don't shine for me, oh, lord, no.
The sun don't shine for me, no more.
The sun don't shine for me, oh no.

The sun don't shine for me, no more.
The sun don't shine for me, oh, lord, no.
The sun don't shine for me, no more.
The sun don't shine for me, oh no.




 
Jeremy Hush

Thursday, 7 September 2017

The House That Jack Built

This is the horse the kicked the cow...that chased the dog that bit the cat...that killed the rat...that lived in the house that Jack built.

The Avengers, Season 4, Episode 23, 1966




Emma holds her old childhood doll as she looks the exhibit of her life


Key-Elan

Director: Don Leaver
Writer: Brian Clemens (teleplay)

Mrs. Peel is bequeathed an old house by an uncle Jack, whom she never knew existed. In the event, he did not exist. The house is a former lunatic asylum and it is all a ruse by a vengeful ex-employee of Mrs. Peel's to submit her to mind games which will drive her insane.

Emma comes to Steed's home to tell him she cannot have lunch with him because she inherited a house from an uncle she never knew. She places the key to the estate on photo paper Steed has sitting out. He is developing some holiday snaps. Anyway Emma leaves Steed's apartment and travels to her legacy.

Patrick Macnee ... John Steed
Diana Rigg ... Emma Peel







A plastic mould of Professor Keller's head glows in the blackness behind Emma Peel

The centre of the maze

 
Elmira Humphries, Radio Queen, 1939


Professor Keller: [voice over] I am dead. I've been dead for quite some time. Only the house is alive. Only the house...

The glass case surrounding Professor Keller's preserved corpse cracks and splinters as the house breaks down

 

 

Yoann Pennard